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The Rift Valley Institute, in collaboration with the Ministry of Culture, Museums and National Heritage, is sharing selected, approved documents from the South Sudan National Archives through social media channels to showcase the range of information available in the collection. This project is implemented in partnership with UNESCO with funding from the Norwegian Government.

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The Rift Valley Institute, Catholic University of South Sudan, and Likikiri Collective are pleased to release the fruits of their latest collaboration. 'We're Graduates Now...' An Oral History Exhibition of University Graduates' Educational Journeys is borne out of an oral history course hosted by the three institutions for faculty and graduates of universities in South Sudan and…

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2021-02-01

South Sudanese people have extensive knowledge of infectious diseases and experience of organizing responses to epidemics during wars and other crises. There are multiple, locally-specific methods used by communities for interrupting infection transmission and managing epidemics. This report documents these community infectious disease management strategies based on sustained investigative…

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2021-02-01

This briefing summarizes findings from a recent project on community approaches to epidemic management in South Sudan, which began in response to the global coronavirus pandemic and was designed to document how communities across South Sudan have created systems and structures to control the spread of epidemics and infectious diseases in the country.

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In the second conversation with researchers from the Displaced Tastes project, Magnus Taylor—RVI’s Publications Manager—talks to Luga Aquila about his work on the cultural and economic significance of cassava for the Pujulu people of Central Equatoria, South Sudan. In particular, Luga explains the significance of Yoyoji-yojaja, a form of cassava cultivated by young men as a…

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In this short conversation with RVI researcher Elizabeth Nyibol, Magnus Taylor—RVI’s Publications Manager—discusses the life of Elizabeth’s aunt, Mary Ajok, who is the main subject of a paper written by Nyibol in 2020. Mary’s life illustrates the extraordinary lengths that South Sudanese women have gone to in order to preserve their culture of seed cultivation, especially in times of conflict…

In many countries around the world, the suppression of infectious disease has dominated life in 2020. Living through the COVID-19 pandemic, it has been impossible to ignore the fact that diseases, and human efforts to control them, are deeply shaped by social and political factors, as much as they are by biological ones.

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2020-12-10

In February 2020 Sudan’s president, Salva Kiir, appointed Hussein Abdel Bagi—head of the South Sudan Opposition Alliance (SSOA)—as one of his five vice-presidents. Like his father, Hussein Abdel Bagi has forged strong relationships with Sudan’s security elites and powerful borderland communities, which has made him an increasingly important player in South Sudan’s relations with Khartoum.

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The Rift Valley Institute and Juba in The Making will be hosting a discussion of the new film, And The Country Still Needs Us: A story of the chiefs of South Sudan. The conversation will focus on the making of the film and key issues that it raises around traditional justice and the absence of women’s voices in traditional authorities.

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On 20 January, the Rift Valley Institute launched a new book by former US diplomat, Elizabeth Shackelford, The Dissent Channel: American Diplomacy in a Dishonest Age. The book documents Shackelford's experience in South Sudan in 2013–14 and exposes the costs of a longstanding trend of impunity for injustice, and the role of the international community in enabling it.